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Thank you!

Today was one of those days when I inject twice.. early in the morning my daily injection of Forteo for the severe osteoporosis. Then sometime mid-afternoon, Humira. I have to calculate well to make sure I don't overdo it in one spot on my thighs.
As always, despite Humira being a pen and Forteo a needle (in sight), I am always SO nervous with Humira. And hesitate for several minutes before clicking the pen. Sometimes crying, sometimes praying, many times just feeling so sorry for myself. But always feeling thankful that it exists and that I'm so lucky to have access to it.
Today, however, while I hesitated, I remembered this community and for a few seconds thought of how many of the members here go through this same process every two weeks, like I do. And with that, I felt enough courage to click - and count. And it was over (and absolutely painless) so quickly.
Thank you so much for sharing your stories. I am very thankful to have found this community, I feel much less lonely in this journey. Knowing about others' challenges really helps me in these critical moments. 😀




  1. We are delighted you found us as well. I hope you can overcome the hesitation about Humira. I do not know how long you ave been using it, but I know several who had this hesitation because the injection hurt. I hope if this is your experience that things are better since the citric acid was removed a few months ago.


    rick - moderator

    1. I did take it for two years 2016-2018 and I remember it being so much more painful then. It really isn't painful AT ALL right now! But the whole pen clicking thing makes me a bit nervous.
      Then there's all that comes with it, all pages and blogs and stories I read about AS referencing Humira as some sort of doomed medication, really highlighting it's possible side effects much more than I desired to have read. And that's usually written by someone who has options, while I have no alternative. I need to take this medication and avoid further damage. And I don't need to hear (or read) someone saying how they successfully refused it and led a painless life with a good diet and sports. These two alone will not help me...
      I try to be confident that this is a standard pharma disclaimer, cited to protect them and that medications in general will all have some possible side effects. YET it still keeps me up at night with fear and insecurity...


    2. There are no secrets about how to overcome negative self talk. I wish I had some way of doing it myself. All I can say is that I also faced a moment like you describe. The medication was / is Rituxan. If you read the warnings on that medication you will likely understand why I was so concerned when my docotr said that was all that was left for me.


      I told my doctor no and he said OK lets talk in a month. Three weeks later I crawled back into his office and begged for it. That was right years ago and I am so glad I agreed to use the medication.


      I do not suggest anyone has the same path. But for me, walking was more important than reading what others say about Rituxan.


      You may like the blog posted today by Auldyn Matthews-McGee - it is on a very similar topic.


      https://ankylosingspondylitis.net/living/biologic-decisions


      best


      rick - moderator

  2. - I just saw this today and wanted to send over some virtual hugs <3 I love that the thought of everyone in this community gave you what you needed to get by. It gives me goosebumps just talking about it! This truly is a special place! Sending hugs and warm vibes your way. -Anthony (Team Member)

    1. Hey folks this is new territory for me since all the options I had never worked. I don't know what type of Dr to get. Is a rheumatologist a good place to start? I went to a renowned pain clinic but all I got was injection options. He really didn't talk to me about how I was feeling or exactly where pain was most debilitating. So, I need to find out how to go about finding the right Dr.
      Thanks for all your help.

      1. Hey there @granny56! Yes, a rheumatologist is the type of doctor who will give you an AS diagnosis. You may want to check with your insurance beforehand to see if you require a referral from your primary physician for a specialist visit. Best of luck to you and I hope you can find the answers you are looking for! -Katie, Team Member

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